Parkstone International

  • Anglais Michelangelo

    Eugene Muntz

    • Parkstone international
    • 14 Septembre 2015

    Michelangelo, like Leonardo, was a man of many talents; sculptor, architect, painter and poet, he made the apotheosis of muscular movement, which to him was the physical manifestation of passion. He moulded his draughtsmanship, bent it, twisted it, and stretched it to the extreme limits of possibility. There are not any landscapes in Michelangelo's painting. All the emotions, all the passions, all the thoughts of humanity were personified in his eyes in the naked bodies of men and women. He rarely conceived his human forms in attitudes of immobility or repose. Michelangelo became a painter so that he could express in a more malleable material what his titanesque soul felt, what his sculptor's imagination saw, but what sculpture refused him. Thus this admirable sculptor became the creator, at the Vatican, of the most lyrical and epic decoration ever seen: the Sistine Chapel. The profusion of his invention is spread over this vast area of over 900 square metres. There are 343 principal figures of prodigious variety of expression, many of colossal size, and in addition a great number of subsidiary ones introduced for decorative effect. The creator of this vast scheme was only thirty-four when he began his work. Michelangelo compels us to enlarge our conception of what is beautiful. To the Greeks it was physical perfection; but Michelangelo cared little for physical beauty, except in a few instances, such as his painting of Adam on the Sistine ceiling, and his sculptures of the Pietà. Though a master of anatomy and of the laws of composition, he dared to disregard both if it were necessary to express his concept: to exaggerate the muscles of his figures, and even put them in positions the human body could not naturally assume. In his later painting, The Last Judgment on the end wall of the Sistine, he poured out his soul like a torrent. Michelangelo was the first to make the human form express a variety of emotions. In his hands emotion became an instrument upon which he played, extracting themes and harmonies of infinite variety. His figures carry our imagination far beyond the personal meaning of the names attached to them.

  • Anglais Egon Schiele

    Jeanette Zwingenberger

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Egon Schiele's work is so distinctive that it resists categorisation. Admitted to the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts at just sixteen, he was an extraordinarily precocious artist, whose consummate skill in the manipulation of line, above all, lent a taut expressivity to all his work. Profoundly convinced of his own significance as an artist, Schiele achieved more in his abruptly curtailed youth than many other artists achieved in a full lifetime. His roots were in the Jugendstil of the Viennese Secession movement. Like a whole generation, he came under the overwhelming influence of Vienna's most charismatic and celebrated artist, Gustav Klimt. In turn, Klimt recognised Schiele's outstanding talent and supported the young artist, who within just a couple of years, was already breaking away from his mentor's decorative sensuality. Beginning with an intense period of creativity around 1910, Schiele embarked on an unflinching exposé of the human form - not the least his own - so penetrating that it is clear he was examining an anatomy more psychological, spiritual and emotional than physical. He painted many townscapes, landscapes, formal portraits and allegorical subjects, but it was his extremely candid works on paper, which are sometimes overtly erotic, together with his penchant for using under-age models that made Schiele vulnerable to censorious morality. In 1912, he was imprisoned on suspicion of a series of offences including kidnapping, rape and public immorality. The most serious charges (all but that of public immorality) were dropped, but Schiele spent around three despairing weeks in prison. Expressionist circles in Germany gave a lukewarm reception to Schiele's work. His compatriot, Kokoschka, fared much better there. While he admired the Munich artists of Der Blaue Reiter, for example, they rebuffed him. Later, during the First World War, his work became better known and in 1916 he was featured in an issue of the left-wing, Berlin-based Expressionist magazine Die Aktion. Schiele was an acquired taste. From an early stage he was regarded as a genius. This won him the support of a small group of long-suffering collectors and admirers but, nonetheless, for several years of his life his finances were precarious. He was often in debt and sometimes he was forced to use cheap materials, painting on brown wrapping paper or cardboard instead of artists' paper or canvas. It was only in 1918 that he enjoyed his first substantial public success in Vienna. Tragically, a short time later, he and his wife Edith were struck down by the massive influenza epidemic of 1918 that had just killed Klimt and millions of other victims, and they died within days of one another. Schiele was just twenty-eight years old.

  • Anglais Claude Monet

    Nathalia Brodskaya

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    For Claude Monet the designation `impressionist' always remained a source of pride. In spite of all the things critics have written about his work, Monet continued to be a true impressionist to the end of his very long life. He was so by deep conviction, and for his Impressionism he may have sacrificed many other opportunities that his enormous talent held out to him. Monet did not paint classical compositions with figures, and he did not become a portraitist, although his professional training included those skills. He chose a single genre for himself, landscape painting, and in that he achieved a degree of perfection none of his contemporaries managed to attain. Yet the little boy began by drawing caricatures. Boudin advised Monet to stop doing caricatures and to take up landscapes instead. The sea, the sky, animals, people, and trees are beautiful in the exact state in which nature created them - surrounded by air and light. Indeed, it was Boudin who passed on to Monet his conviction of the importance of working in the open air, which Monet would in turn transmit to his impressionist friends. Monet did not want to enrol at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He chose to attend a private school, L'Académie Suisse, established by an ex-model on the Quai d'Orfèvres near the Pont Saint-Michel. One could draw and paint from a live model there for a modest fee. This was where Monet met the future impressionist Camille Pissarro. Later in Gleyre's studio, Monet met Auguste Renoir Alfred Sisley, and Frédéric Bazille. Monet considered it very important that Boudin be introduced to his new friends. He also told his friends of another painter he had found in Normandy. This was the remarkable Dutchman Jongkind. His landscapes were saturated with colour, and their sincerity, at times even their naïveté, was combined with subtle observation of the Normandy shore's variable nature. At this time Monet's landscapes were not yet characterized by great richness of colour. Rather, they recalled the tonalities of paintings by the Barbizon artists, and Boudin's seascapes. He composed a range of colour based on yellow-brown or blue-grey. At the Third Impressionist Exhibition in 1877 Monet presented a series of paintings for the first time: seven views of the Saint-Lazare train station. He selected them from among twelve he had painted at the station. This motif in Monet's work is in line not only with Manet's Chemin de fer (The Railway) and with his own landscapes featuring trains and stations at Argenteuil, but also with a trend that surfaced after the railways first began to appear. In 1883, Monet had bought a house in the village of Giverny, near the little town of Vernon. At Giverny, series painting became one of his chief working procedures. Meadows became his permanent workplace. When a journalist, who had come from Vétheuil to interview Monet, asked him where his studio was, the painter answered, "My studio! I've never had a studio, and I can't see why one would lock oneself up in a room. To draw, yes - to paint, no". Then, broadly gesturing towards the Seine, the hills, and the silhouette of the little town, he declared, "There's my real studio."Monet began to go to London in the last decade of the nineteenth century. He began all his London paintings working directly from nature, but completed many of them afterwards, at Giverny. The series formed an indivisible whole, and the painter had to work on all his canvases at one time. A friend of Monet's, the writer Octave Mirbeau, wrote that he had accomplished a miracle. With the help of colours he had succeeded in recreating on the canvas something almost impossible to capture: he was reproducing sunlight, enriching it with an infinite number of reflections. Alone among the impressionists, Claude Monet took an almost scientific study of the possibilities of colour to its limits; it is unlikely that one could have gone any further in that direction.

  • Allemand Francisco Goya

    Sarah Carr-Gomm

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Goya ist einer der zugänglichsten Maler. Seine Kunst ist wie sein Leben ein offenes Buch und es ist nicht die Kunst einer idealen, sondern einer garstigen und unheimlichen Welt. Er kam als Sohn eines Vergolders in einem kleinen Bergdorf mit hundert Einwohnern zur Welt. Als Kind arbeitete er zusammen mit seinen Geschwistern auf dem Feld, bis sein Zeichentalent entdeckt wurde. Dank der Vermittlung eines Gnners kam er als 14-Jähriger zu einem Hofmaler in Saragossa in die Lehre und zog als 19-Jähriger nach Madrid. Abgesehen von wunderbar dekorativen Kartons für die Gobelinmanufaktur und fünf kleinen Bildern malte Goya bis zu seinem 37. Jahr nichts Bedeutendes, doch nach seiner Bestellung zum Hofmaler entfaltet er eine Produktivität, die der von Rubens nicht nachsteht. Es folgt ein zeitweise von Krankheit getrübtes Jahrzehnt unglaublichen Schaffens und der Skandale. In seinen Radierungen zeigt er sich als herausragender Zeichenkünstler. In seiner Malerei ist er stark von Velásquez beeinflusst und wie dieser von seinem Modell abhängig, wobei er sich einer rücksichtslosen Wirklichkeitstreue befleißigt, die gelegentlich auch in die Karikatur umschlägt. Hässlichkeit wird genau so dramatisiert wie Liebreiz und Schnheit. Seine Grafikzyklen, die Kaprizen und die Kapriolen sind aufs Sorgfältigste durchdacht und psychologische Meisterwerke. Seine fantastischen Figuren erfüllen uns mit einer hämischen Freude, regen unsere diabolischen Instinkte an und lassen uns erschauern. Am deutlichsten offenbar wird sein Genie in seinen Radierungen über die Schrecken des Krieges. Neben diesen Darstellungen wirkt jedes andere Kriegsbild blass und sentimental. Er konzentriert sich auf vereinzelte Szenen der Grausamkeit. Nirgendwo sonst zeigt er eine solche Beherrschung von Form und Bewegung, so dramatische Gesten und eine so gekonnte Wirkung von Licht und Dunkel wie in diesem Aufbegehren gegen die Gewalt. Doch malte er auch volksnahe Vergnügungen sowie Portraits. Vergessen wir nicht, dass dieser außerordentlich vielseitige Künstler auch das schnste spanische Aktbild, die Nackte Maja, schuf.

  • James McNeill Whistler

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Whistler (Lowell, 1834 - Londres 1903)
    Whistler surgit à un moment crucial de l'histoire de l'art et il joue un rôle de précurseur. Il a, comme les Impressionnistes, la volonté d'imposer ses idées. Son oeuvre se déroule en quatre périodes. Dans une première période de recherche, l'artiste est influencé par le réalisme de Courbet et par le japonisme. Puis Whistler trouve son originalité
    avec les Nocturnes et la série des Cremorne Gardens en s'opposant à l'académisme qui veut qu'une oeuvre d'art raconte une histoire. Lorsqu'il peint le portrait de sa mère, Whistler l'intitule Arrangement en gris et noir (p.31), ce qui est significatif de ses théories esthétiques. S'il dépeint les jardins de plaisir de Cremorne, ce n'est pas pour y figurer, comme Renoir, des personnages identifiables, mais pour saisir une atmosphère. Il aime les brumes des bords de la Tamise, les lumières blafardes, les cheminées d'usine. C'est la période au cours de laquelle il fera figure de précurseur et d'aventurier de l'art ; au bord de l'abstraction, il choque ses contemporains. La troisième période est surtout dominée par ses portraits en pied : c'est elle qui lui apportera la gloire. Mais il saura insuffler à un genre pourtant classique sa profonde originalité. Il restitue les personnes dans leur environnement : cela donne une étrange présence aux modèles. Il crée des portraits qualifiés de médiums par ses contemporains et dont Oscar Wilde s'inspirera pour écrire son Portrait de Dorian Gray. Enfin, vers la fin de sa vie, l'artiste réalise des paysages et des portraits dans la grande tradition, très influencé par Velazquez. Whistler fera preuve d'une impressionnante rigueur en faisant sans cesse coïncider son oeuvre avec ses théories. Il n'hésitera pas à croiser le fer avec les théoriciens de l'art les plus célèbres.
    Sa personnalité, ses foucades, son élégance, en font un sujet idéal de curiosité et d'admiration. Ami proche de Mallarmé, admiré par Marcel Proust, dandy provocateur, mondain ombrageux, artiste exigeant, il fut un novateur audacieux.

  • Amedeo Modigliani

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Amedeo Modigliani
    (Livourne, 1884 - Paris, 1920)
    Amedeo Modigliani naquit en Italie en 1884 et mourut à Paris à l'âge de trente-cinq ans. Très tôt il s'intéressa à l'étude du nu et à la notion classique de la beauté idéale.
    En 1900-1901 il visita Naples, Capri, Amalfi et Rome, puis Florence et Venise, et étudia tout d'abord des chefs-d'oeuvre de la Renaissance. Il fut impressionné par les artistes du Trecento (XIVe siècle), parmi lesquels Simone Martini (vers 1284-1344), dont les silhouettes longues et serpentines, représentées avec une grande délicatesse de composition et de couleur et imprégnées d'une tendre tristesse, annonçaient la
    sinuosité et la luminosité manifestes dans l'oeuvre de Sandro Botticelli (vers 1445-1510). Ces deux artistes influencèrent clairement Modigliani, qui utilisa la pose de la Vénus de Botticelli dans La Naissance de Vénus pour son Nu debout (Vénus) (1917) et sa Femme rousse en chemise (1918), ainsi qu'une inversion de cette pose dans son Nu assis au collier (1917). A la dette de Modigliani à l'art du passé (silhouettes des
    Cyclades de la Grèce antique principalement) fut ajoutée l'influence de l'art d'autres cultures (africaines par exemple) et du cubisme. Les cercles et courbes équilibrés, bien que voluptueux, y sont soigneusement tracés et non naturalistes. On les retrouve dans l'ondulation des lignes et la géométrie des nus de Modigliani, tels le Nu Allongé. Les dessins des Caryatides lui permirent d'explorer le potentiel ornemental de poses qu'il eut été incapable de traduire en sculpture. Pour ses séries de nus, Modigliani emprunta les compositions de nombreux nus célèbres du grand art, dont ceux de Giorgione (vers 1477-1510), Titien (vers 1488-1576), Ingres (1780-1867), et Velázquez (1599-1660), en faisant abstraction toutefois de leur romantisme et de la lourdeur du décor.
    Modigliani appréciait également l'oeuvre de Goya (1746-1828) et d'Edouard Manet (1832-1883), qui avaient fait scandale en peignant des femmes de la vie réelle nues, rompant ainsi les conventions artistiques voulant que les nus soient placés dans des cadres mythologiques, allégoriques ou historiques.

  • Gustav Klimt

    Patrick Bade

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Gustav Klimt (Baumgarten, 1862 Vienne, 1918)
    «Faire un autoportrait ne m'intéresse pas. Les sujets de peinture qui m'intéressent ? Les autres et en particulier les femmes » Aucune référence au monde extérieur ne vient contrarier le charme des allégories, portraits, paysages et autres personnages que l'artiste peint. Des couleurs et des motifs d'inspiration orientale (Klimt a été très influencé par le Japon, l'ancienne Egypte et la Ravenne byzantine), un espace bidimentionnel dépourvu de profondeur et une qualité souvent stylisée de l'image, autant d'éléments utilisés par le peintre pour créer une oeuvre séduisante, où le corps de la femme s'expose dans toute sa volupté. A 14 ans, il obtient une bourse d'Etat pour entrer à la Kunstgewerbeschule (l'Ecole viennoise des Arts et Métiers). Très vite, ses talents de peintre et de dessinateur s'affirment. Ses toutes remières oeuvres lui valent un succès inhabituellement précoce. Sa première grande initiative date de 1879 : il crée cette année-là la Künstlerkompagnie (la compagnie des artistes) avec son frère Ernst, et Franz Matsch. A Vienne, la fin du XIXe siècle est une période d'effervescence architecturale. L'empereur François- Joseph décide, en 1857, de détruire les remparts entourant le coeur médiéval de la ville. Le Ring, financé par l'argent du contribuable, est alors construit : de magnifiques résidences y côtoient de superbes parcs. Ces changements profitent à Klimt et à ses associés, leur fournissant de multiples occasions de faire montre de leur talent.
    En 1897, Klimt, accompagné de quelques amis proches, quitte la très conservatrice Künstlerhausgenossenschaft (Société coopérative des artistes autrichiens) ; il fonde le mouvement Sécession et en prend la présidence. La reconnaissance est immédiate. Au-dessus du porche d'entrée de l'édifice, conçu par José Maria Olbrich est inscrite la devise du mouvement : «A chaque âge son art, à l'art sa liberté. » A partir de 1897, Klimt passa pratiquement tous ses étés sur l'Attersee, en compagnie de la famille Flge. Durant ces périodes de paix et de tranquillité, il eut l'occasion de peindre de nombreux paysages qui constituent un quart de son oeuvre complète. Klimt exécute des croquis préparatoires à la plus grande partie de ses réalisations. Parfois, il exécute plus de cent études pour un seul tableau. Le caractère exceptionnel de l'oeuvre de Klimt tient peut-être à l'absence de prédécesseurs et de réels disciples. Il admirait Rodin et Whistler sans les copier servilement. En retour, il fut admiré par les peintres viennois de la jeune génération, tels Egon Schiele et Oskar Kokoschka.

  • Salvador Dalí

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Dalí, Salvador (Figueras, 1904 - Torre-Galatea, 1989)
    Peintre, artiste, créateur d'objets, écrivain et cinéaste, il est connu du public comme un des représentants majeur du surréalisme. Buñuel, Lorca, Picasso, Breton... : ces rencontres constituent autant d'étapes dans la carrière de Dalí. Réalisé avec Buñuel, le film Un chien andalou marque son entrée officielle dans le groupe des surréalistes parisiens où il rencontre Gala, la femme d'Éluard, qui deviendra sa compagne et son inspiratrice. Entre cet artiste éclectique et provocateur et les surréalistes parisiens, les relations se tendront progressivement à partir de 1934 jusqu'à la rupture avec Breton, cinq ans plus tard. Pourtant, l'art de Dalí relève bien de l'esthétique surréaliste dont il a conservé le goût pour le dépaysement, l'humour et l'imagination.

  • Paul Cezanne

    Nathalia Brodskaya

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Paul Cézanne (Aix-en-Provence, 1839 - 1906)
    Depuis sa mort il y a deux siècles, Cézanne est devenu le peintre le plus célèbre du XIXe siècle. Il naquit à Aix-en-Provence en 1839, et la plus belle période de sa vie fut sa prime jeunesse en Provence, qu'il passa en compagnie de Zola, également d'origine italienne. Suivant l'exemple de ce dernier, Cézanne partit pour Paris à l'âge de 21 ans. Il fut déserteur pendant la guerre franco-prussienne, partageant son temps entre la peinture en plein air et son atelier. Il déclara à Vollard, un marchand d'art : «Je ne suis qu'un peintre. L'humour parisien me donne du mal. Peindre des nus sur les rives de l'Arc [une rivière près d'Aix] c'est tout ce que je demande ». Encouragé par Renoir, l'un des premiers à l'apprécier, il exposa avec les impressionnistes en 1874 et en 1877. Il fut reçu avec une dérision qui le blessa. L'ambition de Cézanne, selon ses propres paroles, était «de faire de l'impressionnisme quelque chose d'aussi solide et de durable que les peintures des musées ». Son but était d'atteindre au monumental par un langage moderne de tons incandescents et vibrants. Cézanne voulait reproduire la couleur naturelle d'un objet et l'harmoniser avec les variations de lumière et d'ombre qui tendent habituellement à le détruire ; il désirait élaborer une échelle de tons capables d'exprimer la masse et le caractère de la forme. Cézanne aimait peindre des fruits, parce que c'étaient des modèles dociles et qu'il travaillait lentement. Il ne cherchait pas à reproduire la pomme. Il gardait la couleur dominante et le caractère du fruit, mais amplifiait l'attrait émotionnel de sa forme par un agencement de tons riches et harmonieux. C'était un maître de la nature morte. Ses compositions de fruits et légumes sont véritablement impressionnantes : elles ont le poids, la noblesse, le style des formes immortelles. Aucun autre peintre n'a jamais accordé à une pomme de conviction aussi ardente, de sympathie aussi authentique, ni d'intérêt aussi prolongé. Aucun autre peintre de ce talent n'a jamais réservé dans ses natures mortes ses impulsions les plus fortes à la création de choses nouvelles et vivantes. Cézanne rendit à la peinture la prééminence du savoir - de la connaissance des choses - une qualité essentielle à tout effort créatif. A la mort de son père, en 1886, il devint riche, mais ne changea rien à son train de vie frugal. Peu après, Cézanne se retira définitivement dans sa propriété en Provence. Il fut sans doute le peintre le plus solitaire de son temps. Parfois, il était saisi d'une curieuse mélancolie, d'un noir désespoir. Avec le temps, il devint plus sauvage et exigeant, détruisant des toiles, les jetant dans les arbres par la fenêtre de son atelier, les abandonnant dans les champs, les donnant à son fils pour qu'il en fasse des puzzles, ou aux gens d'Aix. Au début du XXe siècle, quand Vollard débarqua en Provence avec l'intention de spéculer en achetant tous les Cézanne qu'il pouvait emporter, les paysans des environs, apprenant qu'un guignol de Paris cherchait à gagner de l'argent avec des vieilles toiles, se mirent à produire dans leurs granges tout un tas de natures mortes et de paysages. Le vieux Maître d'Aix fut submergé par la joie. Mais la reconnaissance vint trop tard. En 1906, il succomba à une fièvre contractée alors qu'il peignait sous une pluie diluvienne.

  • Anglais Paul Gauguin

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Paul Gauguin was first a sailor, then a successful stockbroker in Paris. In 1874 he began to paint at weekends as a Sunday painter. Nine years later, after a stock-market crash, he felt confident of his ability to earn a living for his family by painting and he resigned his position and took up the painter's brush full time. Following the lead of Cézanne, Gauguin painted still-lifes from the very beginning of his artistic career. He even owned a still-life by Cézanne, which is shown in Gauguin's painting Portrait of Marie Lagadu. The year 1891 was crucial for Gauguin. In that year he left France for Tahiti, where he stayed till 1893. This stay in Tahiti determined his future life and career, for in 1895, after a sojourn in France, he returned there for good. In Tahiti, Gauguin discovered primitive art, with its flat forms and violent colours, belonging to an untamed nature. With absolute sincerity, he transferred them onto his canvas. His paintings from then on reflected this style: a radical simplification of drawing; brilliant, pure, bright colours; an ornamental type composition; and a deliberate flatness of planes. Gauguin termed this style "synthetic symbolism".

  • Anglais Anthony van Dyck

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Van Dyck was accustomed early to Rubens' sumptuous lifestyle; and, when he visited Italy with letters of introduction from his master, lived in the palaces of his patrons, himself adopting such an elegant ostentation that he was spoken of as `the Cavalier Painter'. After his return to Antwerp his patrons belonged to the rich and noble class, and his own style of living was modelled on theirs; so that, when in 1632 he received the appointment of court painter to Charles I of England, he maintained an almost princely establishment, and his house at Blackfriars was a resort of fashion. The last two years of his life were spent travelling on the Continent with his young wife, the daughter of Lord Gowry. His health, however, had been broken by the excesses of work, and he returned to London to die. He was buried at St. Paul's Cathedral.
    Van Dyck tried to amalgamate the influences of Italy (Titian, Veronese, Bellini) and Flanders and he succeeded in some paintings, which have a touching grace, notably in his Madonnas and Holy Families, his Crucifixions and Depositions from the Cross, and also in some of his mythological compositions. In his younger days he painted many altarpieces full of sensitive religious feeling and enthusiasm. However, his main glory was as a portraitist, the most elegant and aristocratic ever known. The great Portrait of Charles I in the Louvre is a work unique for its sovereign elegance. In his portraits, he invented a style of elegance and refinement which became a model for the artists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, corresponding as it did to the genteel luxury of the court life of the period. He is also considered one of the greatest colourists in the history of art.

  • Anglais Harmensz van Rijn Rembrandt

    Emile Michel

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Rembrandt is completely mysterious in his spirit, his character, his life, his work and his method of painting. What we can divine of his essential nature comes through his painting and the trivial or tragic incidents of his unfortunate life; his penchant for ostentatious living forced him to declare bankruptcy. His misfortunes are not entirely explicable, and his oeuvre reflects disturbing notions and contradictory impulses emerging from the depths of his being, like the light and shade of his pictures. In spite of this, nothing perhaps in the history of art gives a more profound impression of unity than his paintings, composed though they are of such different elements, full of complex significations. One feels as if his intellect, that genial, great, free mind, bold and ignorant of all servitude and which led him to the loftiest meditations and the most sublime reveries, derived from the same source as his emotions. From this comes the tragic element he imprinted on everything he painted, irrespective of subject; there was inequality in his work as well as the sublime, which may be seen as the inevitable consequence of such a tumultuous existence.
    It seems as though this singular, strange, attractive and almost enigmatic personality was slow in developing, or at least in attaining its complete expansion. Rembrandt showed talent and an original vision of the world early, as evidenced in his youthful etchings and his first self-portraits of about 1630. In painting, however, he did not immediately find the method he needed to express the still incomprehensible things he had to say, that audacious, broad and personal method which we admire in the masterpieces of his maturity and old age. In spite of its subtlety, it was adjudged brutal in his day and certainly contributed to alienate his public.
    From the time of his beginnings and of his successes, however, lighting played a major part in his conception of painting and he made it the principal instrument of his investigations into the arcana of interior life. It already revealed to him the poetry of human physiognomy when he painted The Philosopher in Meditation or the Holy Family, so deliciously absorbed in its modest intimacy, or, for example, in The Angel Raphael leaving Tobias. Soon he asked for something more. The Night Watch marks at once the apotheosis of his reputation. He had a universal curiosity and he lived, meditated, dreamed and painted thrown back on himself. He thought of the great Venetians, borrowing their subjects and making of them an art out of the inner life of profound emotion. Mythological and religious subjects were treated as he treated his portraits. For all that he took from reality and even from the works of others, he transmuted it instantly into his own substance.

  • Anglais Georgia O'Keeffe

    Gerry Souter

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    In 1905 Georgia travelled to Chicago to study painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1907 she enrolled at the Art Students' League in New York City, where she studied with William Merritt Chase. During her time in New York she became familiar with the 291 Gallery owned by her future husband, photographer Alfred Stieglitz. In 1912, she and her sisters studied at university with Alon Bement, who employed a somewhat revolutionary method in art instruction originally conceived by Arthur Wesley Dow. In Bement's class, the students did not mechanically copy nature, but instead were taught the principles of design using geometric shapes. They worked at exercises that included dividing a square, working within a circle and placing a rectangle around a drawing, then organising the composition by rearranging, adding or eliminating elements. It sounded dull and to most students it was. But Georgia found that these studies gave art its structure and helped her understand the basics of abstraction. During the 1920s O'Keeffe also produced a huge number of landscapes and botanical studies during annual trips to Lake George. With Stieglitz's connections in the arts community of New York - from 1923 he organised an O'Keeffe exhibition annually - O'Keeffe's work received a great deal of attention and commanded high prices. She, however, resented the sexual connotations people attached to her paintings, especially during the 1920s when Freudian theories became a form of what today might be termed "pop psychology". The legacy she left behind is a unique vision that translates the complexity of nature into simple shapes for us to explore and make our own discoveries. She taught us there is poetry in nature and beauty in geometry. Georgia O'Keeffe's long lifetime of work shows us new ways to see the world, from her eyes to ours.

  • Anglais Marc Chagall

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 31 Octobre 2015

    Marc Chagall was born into a strict Jewish family for whom the ban on representations of the human figure had the weight of dogma. A failure in the entrance examination for the Stieglitz School did not stop Chagall from later joining that famous school founded by the Imperial Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and directed by Nicholas Roerich. Chagall moved to Paris in 1910. The city was his "second Vitebsk". At first, isolated in the little room on the Impasse du Maine at La Ruche, Chagall soon found numerous compatriots also attracted by the prestige of Paris: Lipchitz, Zadkine, Archipenko and Soutine, all of whom were to maintain the "smell" of his native land. From his very arrival Chagall wanted to "discover everything". And to his dazzled eyes painting did indeed reveal itself. Even the most attentive and partial observer is at times unable to distinguish the "Parisian", Chagall from the "Vitebskian". The artist was not full of contradictions, nor was he a split personality, but he always remained different; he looked around and within himself and at the surrounding world, and he used his present thoughts and recollections. He had an utterly poetical mode of thought that enabled him to pursue such a complex course. Chagall was endowed with a sort of stylistic immunity: he enriched himself without destroying anything of his own inner structure. Admiring the works of others he studied them ingenuously, ridding himself of his youthful awkwardness, yet never losing his authenticity for a moment.
    At times Chagall seemed to look at the world through magic crystal - overloaded with artistic experimentation - of the Ecole de Paris. In such cases he would embark on a subtle and serious play with the various discoveries of the turn of the century and turned his prophetic gaze like that of a biblical youth, to look at himself ironically and thoughtfully in the mirror. Naturally, it totally and uneclectically reflected the painterly discoveries of Cézanne, the delicate inspiration of Modigliani, and the complex surface rhythms recalling the experiments of the early Cubists (See-Portrait at the Easel, 1914). Despite the analyses which nowadays illuminate the painter's Judaeo-Russian sources, inherited or borrowed but always sublime, and his formal relationships, there is always some share of mystery in Chagall's art. The mystery perhaps lies in the very nature of his art, in which he uses his experiences and memories. Painting truly is life, and perhaps life is painting.

  • Anglais Leonardo da Vinci

    Eugène Müntz

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Leonardo's early life was spent in Florence, his maturity in Milan, and the last three years of his life in France. Leonardo's teacher was Verrocchio. First he was a goldsmith, then a painter and sculptor: as a painter, representative of the very scientific school of draughtsmanship; more famous as a sculptor, being the creator of the Colleoni statue at Venice, Leonardo was a man of striking physical attractiveness, great charm of manner and conversation, and mental accomplishment. He was well grounded in the sciences and mathematics of the day, as well as a gifted musician. His skill in draughtsmanship was extraordinary; shown by his numerous drawings as well as by his comparatively few paintings. His skill of hand is at the service of most minute observation and analytical research into the character and structure of form. Leonardo is the first in date of the great men who had the desire to create in a picture a kind of mystic unity brought about by the fusion of matter and spirit. Now that the Primitives had concluded their experiments, ceaselessly pursued during two centuries, by the conquest of the methods of painting, he was able to pronounce the words which served as a password to all later artists worthy of the name: painting is a spiritual thing, cosa mentale. He completed Florentine draughtsmanship in applying to modelling by light and shade, a sharp subtlety which his predecessors had used only to give greater precision to their contours. This marvellous draughtsmanship, this modelling and chiaroscuro he used not solely to paint the exterior appearance of the body but, as no one before him had done, to cast over it a reflection of the mystery of the inner life. In the Mona Lisa and his other masterpieces he even used landscape not merely as a more or less picturesque decoration, but as a sort of echo of that interior life and an element of a perfect harmony. Relying on the still quite novel laws of perspective this doctor of scholastic wisdom, who was at the same time an initiator of modern thought, substituted for the discursive manner of the Primitives the principle of concentration which is the basis of classical art. The picture is no longer presented to us as an almost fortuitous aggregate of details and episodes. It is an organism in which all the elements, lines and colours, shadows and lights, compose a subtle tracery converging on a spiritual, a sensuous centre. It was not with the external significance of objects, but with their inward and spiritual significance, that Leonardo was occupied.

  • Italien Picasso

    Anatoli Podoksik

    • Parkstone international
    • 8 Mars 2016

    Questo volume contiene numerose opere create da Picasso tra il 1881 e il 1914. Inizialmente, lo stile
    dell'artista è influenzato da El Greco, da Munch e da Toulouse-Lautrec, che lui scoprì da studente a
    Barcellona. Affascinato dall'espressione psicologica, nel suo periodo Blu (1901-1904) Picasso descrive lo squallore morale: le scene di genere, le nature morte e i ritratti sono carichi di malinconia. In seguito, l'artista manifesta un vivo interesse per le figure di acrobati e comincia il periodo Rosa. Dal 1904, data del suo arrivo a Parigi, la sua estetica si evolve in modo considerevole. L'influenza di Cézanne e della scultura iberica lo portano al Cubismo, caratterizzato dalla moltiplicazione dei
    punti di vista sulla superficie pittorica. Oltre a una selezione di dipinti giovanili, questo volume presenta anche numerosi disegni, sculture e fotografie di Picasso.

  • Italien Tamara de Lempicka

    Gerry Souter

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    I ritratti metallici, i nudi e le nature morte di Tamara de Lempicka racchiudono lo spirito dell'Art Deco
    e dell'età del jazz, e riflettono l'elegante ed edonistico stile di vita della ricca e privilegiata élite parigina nel periodo compreso tra le due guerre. Combinando una tecnica decisamente classica a elementi presi in prestito dal Cubismo, e cercando ispirazione nei maestri del ritratto - come Ingres e Bronzino - la sua arte rappresentò la massima espressione della modernità in fatto di glamour, moda e mondanità. Questo volume celebra la bellezza luminosa ed elegante dei più significativi dipinti dell'artista, realizzati negli anni Venti e Trenta, e narra la straordinaria storia della sua vita: dai primi anni a cavallo tra i due secoli, nella Polonia e nella Russia zarista, al clamoroso successo parigino e al lungo declino del periodo americano, per giungere infine alla sua trionfale riscoperta negli anni Settanta, quando i suoi ritratti divennero vere e proprie icone a livello mondiale.

  • Antoine van Dyck

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Anthonis van Dyck
    (Anvers, 1599 - Londres, 1641)
    Van Dyck connut très tôt le train de vie somptueux de Rubens. Lorsqu'il visita l'Italie, muni de lettres d'introduction de son maître, il vécut dans
    les palais de ses mécènes, adoptant lui aussi une telle ostentation dans l'élégance, qu'on parlait de lui comme du «peintre cavalier ». Après son
    retour à Anvers, il calqua son mode de vie sur celui de ses commanditaires, issus des classes riches et nobles, de sorte qu'en 1632, lorsqu'il fut finalement nommé peintre de cour du roi Charles Ier d'Angleterre, il conserva un train de vie presque princier, et sa maison de Blackfriars devint le lieu à la mode. Les deux dernières années de sa vie, van Dyck les passa à voyager sur le continent avec sa jeune épouse, la fille de Lord Gowry. Toutefois, sa santé avait souffert de ses excès, et il rentra à Londres pour y mourir. Il fut enterré dans la cathédrale Saint-Paul.
    Il peignit dans sa jeunesse plusieurs retables, empreints d'un «touchant sentiment religieux et d'enthousiasme », mais sa réputation repose essentiellement sur ses portraits. Avec eux, il inventa un style élégant et raffiné qui devint un exemple pour les artistes des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, reflétant en effet la vie de cour fastueuse de l'époque.
    Van Dyck essaya de réunir les influences italiennes (Titien, Véronèse et Bellini) et flamandes ; il y parvint dans certaines peintures d'une grâce
    touchante, notamment dans ses madones et ses Sainte Famille, ses crucifixions et dépositions de Croix, et également dans quelques compositions mythologiques. Mais c'est comme portraitiste qu'il connut sa plus grande gloire, réputé comme le plus élégant et le plus
    aristocratique de tous les temps. Dans ce domaine, il distança son maître et n'eut aucun rival, à l'exception des peintres de portrait du XVIIIe siècle anglais, dont il fut l'inspirateur. Le magnifique Portrait de Charles 1er, au Louvre, est une oeuvre unique en son genre. Son élégance souveraine, teintée d'une noble et subtile poésie, fait de ce portrait un excellent témoignage psychologique et historique. Il est aussi considéré comme l'un des plus grands coloristes de l'histoire de l'art.

  • Vasily Kandinsky

    Mikhaïl Guerman

    • Parkstone international
    • 12 Juillet 2015

    De retour en Allemagne en 1921, Kandinsky développera sa théorie d'une « science de l'art » dans son ouvrage Du Spirituel dans l'Art à Weimar. La période du Bauhaus est celle de sa plus intense production où son génie est également le mieux reconnu. Cet ouvrage permet d'entrevoir la richesse de l'oeuvre de Kandinsky à travers de nombreuses toiles qui ont contribué au prestige international du peintre.

  • Allemand Anthonis van Dyck

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Van Dyck war Schüler und Mitarbeiter von Rubens. Als er Italien bereiste, lebte er in den Palästen seiner Gnner und trat selbst so vornehm und elegant auf, dass man ihn den Malerkavalier nannte. Er wurde 1632 zum Hofmaler des englischen Knigs Karl II. (1630 bis 1685) ernannt. Seine beiden letzten Lebensjahre verbrachte er mit seiner jungen Frau auf einer Reise durch Europa. Doch seine Gesundheit war von der vielen Arbeit geschädigt, und er kehrte nach London zurück, um dort zu sterben. Seine letzte Ruhestätte fand er in der St. Paul's Cathedral.
    Sein eigentlicher Ruhm gründet in seinen Portraits. Bei diesem Genre fand er zu einem überaus eleganten und raffinierten Stil, der das luxurise hfische Leben haargenau erfasste und zu einem Vorbild für die Künstler des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts wurde. Van Dyck war bestrebt, die italienischen Einflüsse (Tizian, Veronese, Bellini) mit der flämischen Tradition zu verschmelzen. Dort, wo ihm das gelang, haben seine Gemälde eine wunderbare Anmut, vor allem seine Madonnen und Hl. Familien, seine Kreuzigungen und Kreuzesabnahmen und auch manche seiner mythologischen Darstellungen. Doch was die Portraitkunst anbelangt, konnte ihm niemand das Wasser reichen, außer vielleicht die großen englischen Portraitmaler des 18. Jahrhunderts, die ihn sich zum Vorbild nahmen.

  • Allemand J.M.W. Turner

    Eric Shanes

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    J.M.W. Turner wurde 1775 in Covent Garden als Sohn eines Barbiers geboren und starb 1851 in Chelsea. Es bedarf der Erfahrung eines Spezialisten, Gemälde auszusuchen,um ein Werk über diesen Maler zu verfassen, denn mit einem Gesamtwerk von über 19000 Gemälden und Zeichnungen kann Turner als ein äußerst produktiver Maler bezeichnet werden. Sein Name wird einerseits mit einer gewissen Vorstellung der Romantik in den Landschaften und einer bewundernswerten Gewandtheit in der Ausführung seiner Seegemälde verbunden. Andererseits erinnert er aber auch an einen Vorreiter im Umgang mit Farben: an Goethes Theorie der Farben. Man braucht das Talent des großen englischen Kritikers John Ruskin, um Turners Malerei zu interpretieren. Mit Gemälden wie dem Brand des Ober- und Unterhauses, seiner ergreifenden Sicht des Schlachtfeldes von Waterloo und vielen anderen gibt Turner aber auch einen Zeitzeugenbericht ab. Seine Werke werden in zahlreichen Museen ausgestellt, z.B. im British Museum in London sowie in New York, Washington und Los Angeles.

  • Pablo Picasso

    Victoria Charles

    • Parkstone international
    • 30 Juin 2011

    Pablo Picasso (Málaga, 1881 - Mougins, 1973)
    Picasso naquit en Espagne et l'on dit même qu'il commença à dessiner avant de savoir parler. Enfant, il fut nstinctivement attiré par les instruments de l'artiste. Il pouvait passer des heures de joyeuse concentration à dessiner des spirales pourvues d'un sens qu'il était seul à connaître. Fuyant les jeux d'enfants, il traça ses premiers tableaux dans le sable. Cette manière précoce de s'exprimer contenait la promesse d'un rare talent. Nous nous devons de mentionner Málaga, car c'est là, le 25 Octobre 1881, que Pablo Ruiz Picasso naquit et qu'il passa les dix premières années de sa vie. Le père de Picasso était lui-même peintre et professeur à l'école des Beaux-Arts de la ville. Picasso apprit auprès de lui les rudiments de la peinture académique. Puis il poursuivit ses études à l'académie des Arts de Madrid mais n'obtint jamais son diplôme. Picasso, qui n'avait pas encore 18 ans, avait atteint le point culminant de sa rébellion, répudiant l'esthétique anémique de l'académisme et le prosaïsme du réalisme. Tout naturellement, il se joignit à ceux qui se qualifiaient de modernistes, c'est à dire, les artistes et les écrivains non-conformistes, ceux que Sabartés appelait «l'élite de la pensée catalane » et qui se retrouvaient au café des artistes Els Quatre Gats. Durant les années 1899 et 1900, les seuls sujets dignes d'être peints aux yeux de Picasso étaient ceux qui reflétaient la vérité ultime : le caractère éphémère de la vie humaine et l'inéluctabilité de la mort. Ses premières oeuvres, cataloguées sous le nom de «période bleue » (1901-1904), consistent en peintures exécutées dans des teintes bleues, inspirées par un voyage à travers l'Espagne et la mort de son ami Casagemas. Même si Picasso lui-même insistait fréquemment sur la nature intérieure et subjective de la période bleue, sa genèse et, en particulier, ce monochromatisme bleu, furent des années durant, expliqués comme les résultats de diverses influences esthétiques. Entre 1905 et 1907, Picasso entra dans une nouvelle phase, appelée la «période rose » caractérisée par un style plus enjoué, dominé par l'orange et le rose. A Gosal, au cours de l'été 1906, le nu féminin prit une importance considérable pour Picasso - une nudité dépersonnalisée, aborigène, simple, comme le concept de «femme ». La dimension que les nus féminins allaient prendre chez Picasso dans les mois suivants, précisément durant l'hiver et le printemps 1907, s'imposa lorsqu'il élabora la composition de son impressionnante peinture connue sous le titre des Demoiselles d'Avignon.
    S'il est vrai que l'art africain est habituellement considéré comme le facteur déterminant du développement d'une sthétique classique en 1907, les leçons de Cézanne sont quand à elles perçues comme la pierre angulaire de cette nouvelle progression. Ceci est lié tout d'abord à une conception spatiale de la toile comme une entité composée, soumise à un certain système de construction. Georges Braque, dont Picasso devint l'ami à l'automne 1908 et avec lequel il mena le cubisme à son apogée en six ans, fut surpris pas les similitudes entre les expériences picturales de Picasso et les siennes. Il expliquait que le «principal objectif du Cubisme était la matérialisation de l'espace.
    A l'issue de sa période cubiste, dans les années 1920, Picasso revint à un style plus figuratif et se rapprocha du ouvement surréaliste. Il représenta des corps difformes et monstrueux mais d'une manière très personnelle. Après le bombardement de Guernica en 1937, Picasso réalisa l'une de ses oeuvres les plus célèbres, symbole des horreurs de la guerre. Dans les années 1960, son art changea à nouveau et Picasso commença à regarder de plus près les grands maîtres, s'inspirant dans ses tableaux des oeuvres de Velázquez, Poussin, Goya, Manet, Courbet, Delacroix. Les dernières oeuvres de Picasso étaient un mélange de styles, devenant plus colorées, expressives et optimistes. Picasso mourut en 1973, dans sa villa de Mougins. Le symboliste russe Georgy Chulkov écrivit : «La mort de Picasso est une chose tragique. Pourtant, combien ceux qui croient pouvoir imiter Picasso ou apprendre de lui sont en vérité aveugles et naïfs. Apprendre quoi ? Ces formes ne correspondent à aucune émotion existant hors de l'Enfer. Mais être en Enfer signifie anticiper la mort, et les Cubistes ne s'intéressent guère à ce genre de connaissance infinie. »

  • Anglais Kandinsky

    Mikhaïl Guerman

    • Parkstone international
    • 12 Juillet 2015

    Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944) was a Russian painter credited as being among the first to truly venture into abstract art. He persisted in expressing his internal world of abstraction despite negative criticism from his peers. He veered away from painting that could be viewed as representational in order to express his emotions, leading to his unique use of colour and form. Although his works received heavy censure at the time, in later years they would become greatly influential.

empty